Products


Hydrogen Peroxide

We Manufacture Hydrogen Peroxide in 4 different forms which are as follows :

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET(MSDS) for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Technical Data Sheet for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. H2O2 Content
g/100 g
50.0% w/w
2. H2O2 Content @ 20 °C
g/100 ml
59.8% w/v
3.

Volume of Gaseous oxygen (Litre) given off per litre of solutions at 20 °C

(0 °C and 760 mm Hg or 101.325 kPa)

l/l
197
4. Active Oxygen Content
g/kg
235.2
5. Freezing Point
°C
-52.2
6. Boiling Point at 101.325 kPa (760 mm Hg at 0 °C)
°C
113.9
7. Density at 0 °C
kg/dm3
1.211
8. Density at 25 °C
kg/dm3
1.191
9. Density at 50 °C
kg/dm3
1.171


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Strength
% w/w

≥ 50.0

3. Stability
mls of O2/min/25 mls @ 100 °C
≤ 0.3
4. Acidity as H2SO4
g/100 ml

≤ 0.033

4. Phosphate as PO4
mg/L
75 - 250
5. Residue on Evaporation @ 105 °C
mg/kg
≤ 2000
6. Residue on Ignition @ 800 °C
mg/kg
≤ 500
7. Iron as Fe
mg/L
≤ 1.0
8. Colour
Hazen unit
≤ 20.0

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET(MSDS) for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Technical Data Sheet for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. H2O2 Content
g/100 g
60.0% w/w
2. H2O2 Content @ 20 °C
g/100 ml
74.5% w/v
3.

Volume of Gaseous oxygen (Litre) given off per litre of solutions at 20 °C

(0 °C and 760 mm Hg or 101.325 kPa)

l/l
246
4. Active Oxygen Content
g/kg
282.2
5. Freezing Point
°C
-55.5
6. Boiling Point at 101.325 kPa (760 mm Hg at 0 °C)
°C
119.0
7. Density at 0 °C
kg/dm3
1.258
8. Density at 25 °C
kg/dm3
1.236
9. Density at 50 °C
kg/dm3
1.214


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Strength
% w/w
≥ 60.0
3. Stability
mls of O2/min/25 mls @ 100 °C
≤ 0.3
4. Acidity as H2SO4
g/100 ml
≤ 0.045
4. Phosphate as PO4
mg/L
100 - 250
5. Residue on Evaporation @ 105 °C
mg/kg
≤ 2000
6. Residue on Ignition @ 800 °C
mg/kg
≤ 500
7. Iron as Fe
mg/L
≤ 1.0
8. Colour
Hazen unit
≤ 20.0

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET(MSDS) for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Technical Data Sheet for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. H2O2 Content
g/100 g
35.0% w/w
2. H2O2 Content @ 20 °C
g/100 ml
39.6% w/v
3.

Volume of Gaseous oxygen (Litre) given off per litre of solutions at 20 °C

(0 °C and 760 mm Hg or 101.325 kPa)

l/l
130
4. Active Oxygen Content
g/kg
164.6
5. Freezing Point
°C
-33.0
6. Boiling Point at 101.325 kPa (760 mm Hg at 0 °C)
°C
107.4
7. Density at 0 °C
kg/dm3
1.144
8. Density at 25 °C
kg/dm3
1.128
9. Density at 50 °C
kg/dm3
1.110


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Strength
% w/w
≥ 35.0
3. Stability
mls of O2/min/25 mls @ 100 °C
≤ 0.3
4. Acidity as H2SO4
g/100 ml
≤ 0.03
4. Phosphate as PO4
mg/L
75 - 250
5. Residue on Evaporation @ 105 °C
mg/kg
≤ 1200
6. Residue on Ignition @ 800 °C
mg/kg
≤ 500
7. Iron as Fe
mg/L
≤ 1.0
8. Colour
Hazen unit
≤ 20.0

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET(MSDS) for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Technical Data Sheet for HYDROGEN PEROXIDE



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. H2O2 Content
g/100 g
70.0% w/w
2. H2O2 Content @ 20 °C
g/100 ml
90.2% w/v
3.

Volume of Gaseous oxygen (Litre) given off per litre of solutions at 20 °C

(0 °C and 760 mm Hg or 101.325 kPa)

l/l
298
4. Active Oxygen Content
g/kg
329.2
5. Freezing Point
°C
-40.3
6. Boiling Point at 101.325 kPa (760 mm Hg at 0 °C)
°C
125.5
7. Density at 0 °C
kg/dm3
1.307
8. Density at 25 °C
kg/dm3
1.284
9. Density at 50 °C
kg/dm3
1.260


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Strength
% w/w
≥ 70.0
3. Stability
mls of O2/min/25 mls @ 100 °C
≤ 0.3
4. Acidity as H2SO4
g/100 ml
≤ 0.038
4. Phosphate as PO4
mg/L
100 - 300
5. Residue on Evaporation @ 105 °C
mg/kg
≤ 2000
6. Residue on Ignition @ 800 °C
mg/kg
≤ 500
7. Iron as Fe
mg/L
≤ 1.0
8. Colour
Hazen unit
≤ 20.0

Trem Card for Hydrogen Peroxide

Features of Hydrogen Peroxde


The most important chemical property of Hydrogen Peroxide is its ability to provide “active oxygen” to the process concerned. Active oxygen can be explained thus:

In most inorganic and organic compounds which contain oxygen(e.g. water, metal oxides, alcohols, carbonates, etc.), the oxygen atom is bound to another type of atom and cannot be easily split off. Hydrogen Peroxide, on the other hand, contains the group -O-O- in which the two oxygen atoms are directly coupled to each other. The oxygen-oxygen link in such compounds can be broken, liberating one atom as “active oxygen”.

Reactions

Hydrogen Peroxide reacts :

- as an oxidant.

- as an reductant.

- to form other inorganic and organic peroxy compounds.

- to form addition compounds.

Examples of each are as follows :

Oxidant

Reductant

Peroxy Compounds

Addition Compounds



A further type of reaction is its decomposition to water and oxygen represented as-

Under most conditions, decomposition is via various reactions, the exact mechanism depending on the nature of any other materials present.

Reaction Mechanisms

As an oxidant it usually reacts via one of the following mechanisms —

- via ionic reactions.

- oxygen transfer via inorganic and organic peroxygen compounds.

- by electron transfer.

- free radical reactions, usually in the presence of metal catalysts.

Versatility

Its versatility is further enhanced by the following properties—

- effective over whole pH range.

- high oxidation potential (Eo=1.763 at pH 0

Eo=0.878 at pH 14)

- non-contaminating by-product.

- is a liquid and so, easy to use.

Hydrogen Peroxide is widely used on an industrial scale in the production of inorganic and organic chemicals. Examples of its applications are given below:

Inorganic peroxide derivatives

Hydrogen Peroxide forms perhydrates and peroxo compounds with alkali metal salts. The best known are sodium perborate (mono and tetrahydrate NaBO3.H20,NaBO3.4H2O) and sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate 2Na2CO3.3H2O2 which are used as ingredients of heavy duty washing powders. Inorganic peroxides of calcium, zinc, strontium, magnesium and barium are made by reaction of the metal hydroxide with Hydrogen Peroxide.

Peracid Formation

Hydrogen Peroxide reacts with many organic acids to form peracids of which peracetic acid is the best known. It is used as a reagent in organic synthesis and as a bactericide.

Epoxidation

Hydrogen Peroxide and peracids react with unsaturated compounds to produce epoxides. Amongst the commercially important products are epoxidised vegetable oils like soyabean, groundnut and rapeseed, which are used as stabilisers/plasticisers for PVC. Other products of industrial importance include α-olefin oxides and terpene oxides.

Hydroxylation

By selecting more vigorous reaction condition than required for epoxidation, α-olefins and unsaturated oils can be converted to diols. Hydroxylation of the aromatic nucleus is also possible and is used on an industrial scale to produce hydroquinone and catechol.

Lactone formation

Ketones can be oxidised to esters by percarboxylic acids or in some cases by Hydrogen Peroxide. Cyclic ketones form lactones of which the manufacture of ε-caprolactone from cyclohexanone is one example.

Organo-sulphur oxidation

Reactions of Hydrogen Peroxide with organo-sulphur compounds yields disulphides, sulphoxides, sulphones and sulphenamides. These compounds are important as rubber accelerators, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.

Organo-nitrogen oxidation

Tertiay amines react with Hydrogen Peroxide to produce amine oxides which are used as surfactants in the detergent and the cosmetics industries. Secondary amines gives substituted hydoxylamines and primary aromatics amines give nitro compounds

Organic peroxide production

Hydrogen Peroxide is used to produce a wide range of organic peroxides which are used as initiators in the production of polystyrene, PVC, polyethylene and other polymers and as curing agents for polyester resins.

Inorganic chemicals manufacture

Hydrogen Peroxide is used mainly in oxidizing reactions to produce inorganic chemicals of high purity. These include such diverse products as ferric sulphate, hydrazine, sodium chlorite, potassium hydrogen permonosulphate and arsenic acid.

Product purification including bleaching

Hydrogen Peroxide is increasingly used to improve the quality of chemical products. Best known is colour improvement (bleaching), but colourless impurities, if oxidisable, can be removed. Products which may be improved by Hydrogen Peroxide treatment include fatty acids, phthalate esters, sulphonates and sulphuric acid.

Other reactions

Hydrogen Peroxide and peracids have many other applications in organic synthesis including.
• Oxidative cleavage of olefins to aldehydes and acids.
• Oxidation of aromatic side chains.
• Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons to 1-4-quinones.
• Oxidation of aldehydes to various products.
• Oxidation of organo-phosphorus compounds.
• Bromination to avoid formation of HBr.
• Oxidation of iodides to iodoso and iodoxy compounds.

Hydrogen Peroxide is undoubtedly the most versatile bleaching agent available to the textile industry. It offers advantages, namely.

  • Ease of application
  • Potential for reducing process times
  • Minimisation of effluent problems
  • Preservation of textile fibre Quality.
  • A high and extremely stable degree of whiteness.
  • Harmless decomposition products (water and oxygen).

Natural cellulose fibres

Natural cellulosic fibres contain varying quantities of impurities, e.g. cotton seed, fats, waxes and pectins. Early bleaching processes required that most impurities be removed by alkaline or acid treatments.

Hydrogen Peroxide bleaching in an alkaline medium often enables those pretreatments to be less severe or even eliminated whilst retaining the intrinsic qualities of the cellulose. Of special significance is the single stage bleaching process developed by NPL, wherein scouring and bleaching have been combined into a single step.

Hydrogen Peroxide has also been successfully used in the cold bleaching of textile fabrics both in the organised sector as also in the urban/rural based hand-processing sector. Cold bleaching of hand-spun yarn with Hydrogen Peroxide prior to dyeing greatly increases the absorbency thereby reducing the consumption of expensive dyes.

Hydrogen Peroxide is also used for bleaching of coir, jute fibres.

Animal fibres

Wool and silk are bleached easily with Hydrogen Peroxide. After scouring, wool may be bleached by immersion or pad and dry techniques, using alkaline or acid solutions.

Prior to bleaching, silk is usually degummed. Hydrogen Peroxide addition assists this process and it is universally used as the bleaching agent for natural silk, usually in an alkaline solution.

NPL has also developed single stage combined degumming and bleaching of silk especially for Tussah silk.

Artificial or regenerated cellulose fibres

Rayon and spun rayon, produced from regenerated cellulose do not contain many of the impurities associated with natural cellulosic fibres. Bleaching with Hydrogen Peroxide can be carried out with milder conditions than required for cotton.

Synthetic fibres

When used alone, synthesis fibres do not normally require bleaching. However, blends of synthetic fibres with natural or regenerated fibres, e.g. cotton-polyester are frequently bleached. The most popular bleaching agent is Hydrogen Peroxide and it is used in both batch and continuous processes.

Mechanical pulp

Hydrogen Peroxide is the ideal agent for bleaching mechanical and other high yield pulps (thermo-mechanical, chemi-mechanical) to high brightness levels. The brightness is more stable with Hydrogen Peroxide than with any other commercial bleaching agent.

CMP, CSRMP of eucalyptus, CMP bagasse, Cold Soda Semi Chemical Pulp of hardwood and SGW of hardwood can be bleached to high degree of brightness using hydrogen peroxide.

Chemical pulp

Hydrogen Peroxide is an environmentally safe oxidizing agent which does not generate chlorine derivatives in the pulp suspension.

Recirculation of bleaching effluents therefore becomes possible. Also, when recirculation and burning are not practiced, the use of Hydrogen Peroxide produces a less coloured bleaching effluent which reduces the pollution load on surface waters.

For these reasons and its cost effectiveness, the use of Hydrogen Peroxide has good potential in chemical pulp bleaching as a partial replacement for chlorine, chlorine dioxide and sodium/calcium hypochlorite.

Typical applications of Hydrogen Peroxide in chemical kraft pulp bleaching are:

  • in the extraction stage of basic bleaching sequences like CEHH or CEH, Hydrogen Peroxide can effectively replace a part of hypochlorite to give similar or even higher brightness to the pulp. When the pulp is treated with Hydrogen Peroxide in the extraction stage, it not only bleaches the pulp, but also decolourises the extraction liquor to some extent. The resulting bleaching sequences obtained with Hydrogen Peroxide are CEpHH, CEpH and CEpHP.
  • At the end of the bleaching sequence, the use of Hydrogen Peroxide enables a higher brightness and a better brightness stability to be reached. Sequences such as CEHDP and CEHP are operated in several pulp mills throughout the world.

Sulphite pulps are easier to bleach than kraft pulps. Sequences such as CEHP, CPH, CEpHD and PH are used industrially.

Chemical pulp of agro residue such as rice straw, bagasse can be easily bleached to higher and stable brightness by CHP or HP type of bleaching sequence.

Waste paper pulp

Hydrogen Peroxide is an efficient chemical for both mechanical and chemical pulp bleaching. Hydrogen Peroxide is active in alkaline conditions in which waste papers are usually repulped. Hydrogen Peroxide also aids ink removal. For these reasons Hydrogen Peroxide is a very effective and convenient chemical for waste paper upgrading. Added at the repulping stage, it bleaches the pulp fibres and improves ink removal. Added at the bleach tower, Hydrogen Peroxide bleaching benefits from the higher pulp consistency.

Hydrogen Peroxide is used in all types of deinking processes, whether flotation or washing deinking. It is also used in recycling processes where ink is dispersed rather than removed.

‘PAN’ Stage Bleaching

Hydrogen Peroxide is an excellent reagent when used at ‘PAN’ to give bright sugar with excellent keeping quality.

Syrup Bleaching

Hydrogen Peroxide can also be used for syrup bleaching in sugar industry. This gives lot of economic benefits and produces sugar with excellent brightness, good keeping quality and with less sulphur dioxide as well as sulphated ash.

Non edible oils such as Rice Bran Oil (RBO), Harden Rice Bran Oil (HRBO), Neem Oil can be very easily bleached by usage of hydrogen peroxide.

Neat Soap Bleaching

Neat soap can be bleached at kettle or crutcher stage to excellent brightness by usage of hydrogen peroxide.

There are several areas in which Hydrogen Peroxide can assist environmental protection. Since its own ultimate decomposition products are water and oxygen, it is not itself a source of pollution.

Hydrogen sulphide control

Sewage frequently has to be pumped over long distances. Anaerobic conditions can then develop in the sewer system leading to the production of hydrogen sulphide(H2S) with consequent odour and corrosion problems. Injection of Hydrogen Peroxide into the sewer can both eliminate any sulphide already developed and maintain aerobic conditions, thus preventing further sulphide formation.

Sludges and leachate from municipal and industrial refuse tips are frequently subject to the same problems, which Hydrogen Peroxide can cure.

Detoxification of industrial waste waters

Hydrogen peroxide provides an effective means of treating certain toxic industrial pollutants such as cyanides, phenols, nitrites and sulphides. For example, waste water encountered in refinery, chemical or pharmaceutical operations can be treated with Hydrogen Peroxide. Oxidation processes have been developed in which Hydrogen Peroxide is catalysed in various ways according to the nature of the pollutant present, thus achieving detoxification in the most effective manner.

Oxygenation

As a potential source of oxygen, Hydrogen Peroxide is used in biological treatment, particularly at times of overload, for the treatment of bulking sludges, and for the prevention of denitrification in settling tanks.

Cleaning of waste gases

Oxides of nitrogen and sulphur, mercaptans and various other toxic odorous components of waste gases can be removed by oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide after their absorption in an aqueous scrubbing liquor. Examples of successful treatments are - NOx removal from actual pickling operations, deodorisation of gaseous effluents from animal carcass rendering, and sulphur dioxide oxidation.

Hydrogen Peroxide and Caro’s acid

Hydrogen Peroxide is a very attractive reagent to use in metallurgy as its decomposition products are only water and oxygen. A limitation on its efficient use in some applications is a tendency to decompose in the presence of transition metal ions at elevated temperatures. This can be overcome by conversion to Caro’s acid (H2SO5—a stronger oxidant than H2O2) by the following easily performed reaction which is usually carried out at the user’s site:

Extraction of uranium

Uranium is most frequently leached from its ores using a mixture of sulphuric acid and oxidant to convert insoluble uranium (IV) to soluble uranium (VI). Of the commercially available oxidants suitable for this purpose, Caro’s acid combines environmental acceptability with ease of use and ease of control. Caro’s acid acts by oxidising iron ( II ) to iron ( III ) which oxidises uranium.

Separation of cobalt

Cobalt is separated from nickel in acid solution by oxidative hydrolysis with Caro’s acid to cobaltic hydroxide while nickel remains in solution.

Separation of manganese

Manganese ( II ) is oxidized by Caro’s acid and precipitated as manganese dioxide at acid pH, so providing a method for its separation from metals such as cobalt and zinc.

Oxidation of Mo, V, Cr, Fe, Se, As ions

Many metal ions are oxidised to higher valency states by Hydrogen Peroxide and Caro’s acid over a wide range of pH, in reactions which are generally more rapid and stoichiometric than possible with other commonly used oxidants. Selective oxidation of one metal in a mixture of metal ions can often be achieved by control of pH and oxidation potential.

Reduction of Co and Mn from higher valency states

In the presence of some transition metal ions in higher valency states, Hydrogen Peroxide behaves as a reducing agent in acidic solutions. This is a very simple way of dissolving insoluble oxides such as cobalt (III) and manganese (IV).

Precipitation of uranium peroxide

Hydrogen Peroxide reacts with solutions of uranium(VI) in mildly acidic solutions to form insoluble uranium peroxide. As very few other metals form insoluble peroxides under acid conditions, it provides a widely used method for the selective precipitation and purification of uranium.

Metal surface treatments

Hydrogen Peroxide is used to clean, etch, brighten or passivate a number of metals and alloys, the exact effect depending on choice of operating conditions.

It is being increasingly used to avoid problems of fume evolution and effluent disposal associated with other oxidants used in metal surface treatment. In acidic solutions the bath life and performance of Hydrogen Peroxide are enhanced by the use of special stabilisers.

Recovery of metals from scrap

Both Hydrogen Peroxide and Caro’s acid are used in the recovery and purification of valuable metals such as cobalt, vanadium and tungsten from waste materials such as superalloy scrap spent catalysts.

Uses in the electronics industry

Solutions of Hydrogen Peroxide and sulphuric acid are used in etching of printed circuit boards and in other cleaning and etching process throughout the industry.

Hydrogen Peroxide is also used to regenerate cupric chloride etching bath:

Hydrogen Peroxide is also used for cleaning germanium and silicon semi- conductors.

Polymer manufacture

Hydrogen peroxide is widely used as a source of free radicals in emulsion process for the polymerisation of vinyl chloride, vinyl acetate, methyl methacrylate and many other monomers.

Cosmetics

Hydrogen peroxide is used in the bleaching of hair, in fixing dyes by oxidation and in the permanent waving and straightening of hair.

Pharmaceutical antiseptic

The use of dilute solutions of Hydrogen Peroxide as an antiseptic in pharmaceuticals was amongst its first applications.

Sterilisation

The bactericidal and algicidal properties of Hydrogen Peroxide coupled with the advantage that harmless residues are formed when it decomposes,have led to its uses in the following applications:

• Sterilisation of seed and grain.
• Sterilisation of containers in the packaging of milk, fruit juice and other foodstuffs.
• STreatment of swimming pools in conjunction with some proprietary chemicals.
• Treatment of industrial water circuits.
• The cleaning of equipment and lines in the food and dairy industries.
• Sterilisation of contact lenses

Dye Oxidation

The use of Hydrogen peroxide directly, or in the form of its derivatives, sodium perborate and sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate, facilitates the oxidation of vat and some sulphur dyes after their application to textiles in the leuco form

Starch modification

Modification of starch to reduce its viscosity in solution can be achieved by oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide. This provides the paper industry with a convenient route to the desired starch without producing any undesirable by-products.

Antichlor

Hydrogen Peroxide is used to destroy excess chlorine or hypochlorite which may remain from a previous process stage. In both cases the end-products are chloride ions and water.

Manufacture of foams

Hydrogen Peroxide is able to liberate large volume of oxygen gas under controlled conditions with only water as a residue. Processes for the production of foam rubber (natural & synthetic), plastic and concrete have been developed.

Source of Oxygen and energy

The use of Hydrogen Peroxide as a source of oxygen and energy was developed and exploited before and during World War II. It was used as a source of oxygen in the conditions where no air is available (under water or in the stratosphere), and as a source of energy in rapid take-off of aircraft and rockets.

Bleaching of naturally occurring products

Hydrogen Peroxide is used for the bleaching of a wide and varied range of naturally occurring products including wood, oils and fats, wax, bones, furs, straw, wicker, feathers, nuts, sponges, lanolin and gelatine.

Stability:

Hydrogen Peroxide as produced by NPL is very pure and stabilised so as to keep the decomposition rate to minimum. However,the decomposition rate is accelerated if contaminated by soluble metal salts such as those of iron, copper, chromium,vanadium, tungsten, molybdenum, silver and platinum. The same is true of insoluble solids like hydroxides and oxides of the heavy metals as also the noble metals themselves. The most active catalysts for decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide include ruthenium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel,lead/mercuric oxides, platinum, osmium, iridium, palladium,rhodium, silver and gold.

Materials of construction

Selection of construction materials for equipment to be used in service with commercial solutions of Hydrogen Peroxide must be undertaken with care to avoid decomposition problems. These restrictions do not necessarily apply to end-uses, where contact times are short and the solution may be quite dilute and a safe method has been established. Suitable materials for service with Hydrogen Peroxide are:

  • Aluminium of 99.5% minimum purity.
  • Fully austenitic stainless steels like S.S.304
  • Plastics like high density polyethylene
  • Glass

NPL has developed detailed engineering codes and specifications covering the fabrication of storage equipment for Hydrogen Peroxide. Advice and assistance is available on request.

Precautions for storing, handling and transportation of Hydrogen Peroxide in plastic carboys.

Carboys of 50% w/w Hydrogen Peroxide must be stored in cool, shaded godowns free from dusty atmosphere and away from light and heat. Persons handling this material must take the usual precautions of wearing goggles, rubber gloves and shoes.

50% w/w Hydrogen Peroxide is not a combustible substance but it is a supporter of combustion. If it happens to drop or splash on cotton material, dry grass, or wood, some fumes may be observed. If the leakage is not stopped in time, the amount of heat generated due to decomposition may be strong enough for the above material to catch fire. The fire could be vigorous depending upon the type of material it comes in contact with.

If the peroxide in carboys is not contaminated or exposed to excessive heat, the development of cracks or bursting with pressure will not normally happen.

Under no circumstances should Hydrogen Peroxide be transported in the same truck with any other merchandise. If the carboys are exposed to the heat of the sun, the wooden floor of the trucks should be kept wet with water, taking care not to bathe the carboys with water as the water may enter the carboys through the vents and contaminate the contents, leading to decomposition.

Carboys should be emptied either by pouring or siphoning. In the case of siphoning, the material of construction should be restricted to HDPE.

Hydrogen Peroxide will cause irritation of the skin, the mucous membranes and in particular the eyes. Such irritation increases in severity with higher strength of the solutions involved. The affected parts should be washed with copious quantities of water.

If accidentally swallowed, Hydrogen Peroxide may cause injury by dilation of the oesophagus and of the stomach due to the sudden release of oxygen. Plenty of warm water should be given to drink.

In the event of contact of Hydrogen Peroxide with the eyes, the eyes should be thoroughly washed with copious quantities of water.

In all the above cases, medical attention is advised.

NPL supplies Hydrogen Peroxide 50% w/w in 30 kgs, 50 kgs & 250 kgs non-returnable HDPE carboys/barrels as also in specially constructed dedicated road tankers.


Principle

Hydrogen peroxide in a diluted portion of the sample is quantitatively oxidized by titration with a potassium permanganate solution of known strength. Compounds that are oxidized by potassium permanganate under acidic conditions interfere.

Reagents

All reagents should be analytical reagent grade, and only demineralised water should be used.

A. Potassium Permanganate (KMnO4): 1N-Potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizer; wear gloves and safety glasses. Weigh 32 g of KMnO4 into a 1-liter beaker. Add 500 mL of water and stir until all the KMnO4 is in solution. Boil for one hour, cool, and filter through a fritted glass crucible into a 1-liter volumetric flask. Dilute to volume and mix well. Store in a dark-colored bottle. Standardize using the method given in Procedure below.

B. Sodium Oxalate (Na2C2O4): Sodium oxalate is toxic; wear gloves and avoid breathing dust.

C. Sulfuric Acid (1:3): Wearing gloves and safety goggles, slowly add 50 mL of sulfuric acid (Analytical Reagent Grade 96%) to 150 mL of water in a 250-mL beaker while constantly stirring. Allow the solution to cool to room temperature before using.

Procedure

A. Standardization of Potassium Permanganate (1.0N)

1. Weigh (to the nearest 0.1 mg) about 1.0 g of dry sodium oxalate into a 500-mL Erlenmeyer flask.
2. Add 200 mL of water, 50 mL of H2SO4 (1:3), and a few glass beads.
3. Heat the solution to boiling on a hot plate.
4. Remove the flask from heat and add the potassium permanganate solution from a 50-mL Class-A burette until the first appearance of a faint pink color that persists for 30 seconds.

Do not let the temperature of the solution in the flask fall below 70°C before the endpoint is reached.

Normality of KMnO4 = (Weight Na2C2O4)*(2)*(1000)/((mL KMnO4)*(134))


B. Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide

1.Weigh in a glass weigh bottle to the nearest 0.1 mg Using a Mohr pipette:
• ± 2.0 g of sample for 20% to 35% H2O2
• ± 1.2 g of sample for 50% to 60% H2O2
• ± 1.0 g of sample for 70% H2O2
• a proportionally larger sample for residual H2O2.

2. Immediately reweigh the glass bottle to the nearest 0.1 mg. Let the weight of the sample be as "W".
3. Transfer the sample to a 500-mL volumetric flask containing about 100 mL of 10% v/v H2SO4 .
4. Add the standardized potassium permanganate solution from a 50-mL Class-A burette until the first appearance of a faint pink color that persists for 30 seconds. Record the volume required as "V" mls.

Calculation

% H2O2 (w/w) = {(V)*(N)*(1.7008)}/W

where

V = mL of potassium permanganate used in titration.

N = normality of potassium permanganate and

W = grams of sample weighed.


Due to the very wide versatility of Hydrogen Peroxide, NPL’s technical services extends to almost all spheres of industrial activity in the country today. Laboratory trials and development work invariably followed up with extended plant trials at the customer’s premises. This has resulted in various new processes being developed in the processing of textile, both for the mill sector and the non-power hand processing sector. Similarly, NPL’s technical services personnel have been successful in optimising the use of Hydrogen Peroxide in the bleaching of pulp for the paper industry. Very useful work has also been done in collaboration with various industries and civic authorities in the treatment of effluent waters.

NPL, thus, offers its customers a complete range of technical services on all matters related to Hydrogen Peroxide application, installation of storage tanks, handling and usage. Any special problems, arising out of the circumstances of use, are also attended to.

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET(MSDS) for Compresed Hydrogen Gas

Trem Card for Compressed Hydrogen Gas

Product Data Sheet for 5 % Acetic Acid

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for 5 % Acetic Acid



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. Peracetic acid
% w/w
5
2. Density at 20°C
g/ml
1.10
3. Available Oxygen
% w/w

~11.5

4. Viscosity at 20°C
cP
2
5. Freezing Point
°C
<-20
6. Self- Accelerating Decomposition Temperature (SADT)
°C

≥ 55

7. Boiling Point
N/A
8. Flash Point
°C
N/A


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Purity as PAA(Peracetic Acid Content)
% w/w
5.0 - 8.0
3. Hydrogen Peroxide Content
% w/w
20.0 - 23.0

PRODUCT DATA SHEET for 15% Acetic Acid



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. Peracetic acid
% w/w
15
2. Density at 20°C
g/ml
1.12
3. Available Oxygen
% w/w
~13.5
4. Viscosity at 20°C
cP
2
5. Freezing Point
°C
<-20
6. Self- Accelerating Decomposition Temperature (SADT)
°C

≥ 55

7. Boiling Point
N/A
8. Flash Point
°C
116


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Appearence
Clear, Colorless Liquid
2. Purity as PAA(Peracetic Acid Content)
% w/w
15.0 - 18.0
3. Hydrogen Peroxide Content
% w/w
20.0 - 23.0

Trem Card for Peracetic Acid



No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. Available Oxygen
% w/w

14.5 - 15.9

2. Bulk Density
gmc/cc
0.5 - 0.6
3. NA20 Content
% w/w
29.3 - 30.8
4. B203 Content
% w/w
33.0 - 34.8
5. Particle size distribution
On BSS 20 Mesh
% w/w

≤ 1.0

On BSS 35 Mesh
% w/w
≤ 15.0 - 80.0
Through BSS 100 Mesh
% w/w
≤ 5.0


No.
PROPERTIES
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Molecular Weight
99.80
2. Molecular Formula
NAB03H20
3. General Appearence
White free flowing odourless powder with bulk density of about 0.5 - 0.6 gms/cc without any lumps
4. Melting Point
142 °C ( with decomposition above 65 °C)
5. PH (1% Solution)
10.4 to 10.6
6. Solubility
Solubility in water @ 20.0 ° C
15.0 gpl
Solubility in water @ 30.0 ° C
40.0 gpl


No.
PROPERTIES
UNITS
VALUES
1. Available Oxygen
% w/w MIN

≥ 10.0

2. Bulk Density
gmc/cc
0.7 - 0.9
3. NA20 Content
% w/w
18.0 - 20.0
4. B203 Content
% w/w
22.0 - 22.5


No.
PROPERTIES
SPECIFICATIONS
1. Molecular Weight
153.9
2. Molecular Formula
NAB034H20
3. General Appearence
White free flowing odourless powder with bulk density of about 0.7 - 0.9 gms/cc without any lumps
4. Melting Point
60 ° C with decomposition
5. PH (1% Solution)
10.4
6. Solubility
Solubility in water @ 20.0 ° C
23.0 gpl
Solubility in water @ 30.0 ° C
37.0 gpl

The information contained in this site is given in good faith and by way of a guide, but implies no guarantee. It cannot be regarded as a recommendation that our products should be used in opposition to existing patents. National or local regulations covering work safety and hygiene are applicable in all cases and we can accept no liability where such regulations are not observed.

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